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A garden of flowers to cut

Flowers in the house all year round? Horticulturist Laurie Perron presents her colorful ideas for growing and making original bouquets from spring to fall… and even in winter!



Isabelle morin
Isabelle morin
Press

There are several advantages to flourishing your living space. The most obvious thing is to enjoy the beauty of the spectacle in the garden and in the house, where you can sow bouquets of cut flowers. And the pleasure is not only for the eyes, because the sense of smell also benefits … and sometimes even the taste: the flowers make the happiness of the foragers and, by extension, that of the vegetable plants and the fruit trees, which they fertilize by transporting pollen.

Everyone wins, argues horticulturalist and landscape architect Laurie Perron who, in 2014, started Jungle Fleur, a small business that delivers bouquets of fresh or dried flowers, inspired by her favorites. “You have to see the garden as a whole,” she says. It has its own balance, which it draws from diversity. If we put flowers there, we also help the vegetable garden. ”

Jungle fleur has taken root on a piece of family land in Contrecœur. However, it is in the heart of Montreal, in a small urban courtyard located at the back of a house on Sherbrooke Street, that Laurie Perron cultivated her love of plants. Her mother used to grow some fruits, herbs, a magnolia, a lilac, flowers … And it is there, in this urban microjungle, that her career choice stopped.

“My mother used to garden creatively, using the resources of the garden: willow branches to make trellises or shavings, for example. I didn’t learn to garden with pesticides. For me, this is the logical way to garden, ”says the horticulturalist, who clearly shows her commitment to ethical and ecological production in Gardening naturally, released this spring. “If you make room for biodiversity, you don’t have to control everything. ”

PHOTO PROVIDED BY JUNGLE FLEUR

Laurie Perron, horticulturalist and founder of Jungle fleur

Each flower is important, whether large or small. And every gesture counts, whether it’s growing a few herbs on your balcony or in a large garden.

Laurie Perron, horticulturalist and founder of Jungle fleur

PHOTO PROVIDED BY JUNGLE FLEUR

Gardening naturally, by Laurie Perron and Sarah Quesnel-Langlois, perfume ink editions, 2021

A few tips to make your universe flourish

  • Featured in May: Tulip, Daffodil and Larch

    SARAH QUESNEL-LANGLOIS / JUNGLE FLOWER

    Featured in May: Tulip, Daffodil and Larch

  • Featured in June: Peony, Lupine and Benoît

    SARAH QUESNEL-LANGLOIS / JUNGLE FLOWER

    Featured in June: Peony, Lupine and Benoît

  • Featured in August: Chamomile, Gladiolus, and Platycodon

    SARAH QUESNEL-LANGLOIS / JUNGLE FLOWER

    Featured in August: Chamomile, Gladiolus, and Platycodon

  • Featured in September: the cosmos, rudbeckie and ammi majus

    SARAH QUESNEL-LANGLOIS / JUNGLE FLOWER

    Featured in September: the cosmos, rudbeckie and ammi majus

  • Featured in October: Dahlia, Aster and Grasses

    SARAH QUESNEL-LANGLOIS / UNGLE FLEUR

    Featured in October: Dahlia, Aster and Grasses

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Choose well

For each month, select three to five plants that will flower at the same time. This ensures that you have bouquets of flowers to marry and pollinators in the garden at all times. “The big issue right now is global warming. I have observed that some sun-loving plants do best in partial shade. You can also shade them by climbing large squash, for example. ”

Put some greenery

Incorporating foliage and herbs into the bouquets adds to their appeal. We can also save a portion of herbs for consumption, one for the bouquets and share the rest with the foragers.

To diversify

I like having different sizes of flowers and foliage in the garden: the most delicate, the wildest, the biggest which give the whole thing panache. It also helps attract different insects. Also consider scattering the plantings rather than planting a single variety in one spot. It will then be less vulnerable to infestations, since there is a risk that it will pass through it. ”

Think local

Wildflowers, we don’t see them at Costco, emphasizes Laurie, advising the integration of native species in the flower beds. They promote local diversity in addition to being adapted to our climates and our fauna. ”

Sow

We think about it for vegetables, but often less for flowers, observes the gardener. It is an economical solution. Several flowers can be sown directly in the ground, such as lavender, nasturtium, calendula, zinnia, wild carrot, tansy, goldenrod and other flowers native to Quebec. It is also the time to plant the summer bulbs (daylily, gladiolus, canna, garlic, dahlia…). ”

Keep flowers for fall and winter

In an idea of ​​ethical consumption, one can appreciate its dried flowers in winter, rather than buying them fresh from the other side of the world, estimates Laurie. All fresh bouquets can be hung upside down in the shade and in a dry place to dry. “It’s ideal, but when it’s for personal use, I hang them wherever I want. It makes a nice decoration. The only thing to know is that the wetter it is, the longer it will take to dry, she says. Waterlogged stems are more difficult to dry. It’s a lot of trial and error, but when in doubt, don’t hesitate to experiment and have fun. ”

SARAH QUESNEL-LANGLOIS / JUNGLE FLOWER

Bouquet of dried autumn flowers

His five favorites

  • Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus): for its spiky bloom and peppery smell

    PHOTO SARAH QUESNEL-LANGLOIS / JUNGLE FLEUR

    Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus): for its flowering on the cob and its peppery smell

  • Benoîte: very small, it nevertheless sports bright colors and pretty stamens.  Delicate, she seems to dance in the wind.

    PHOTO SARAH QUESNEL-LANGLOIS, PROVIDED BY JUNGLE FLEUR

    Benoîte: very small, it nevertheless sports bright colors and pretty stamens. Delicate, she seems to dance in the wind.

  • Lavender (L. angustifolia, syn L. officinalis): abundant, easy to grow and so versatile, in addition to attracting pollinators.

    PHOTO OLIVIER PONTBRIAND, ARCHIVES THE PRESS

    Lavender (L. angustifolia, syn L. officinalis): abundant, easy to grow and so versatile, in addition to attracting pollinators.

  • Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea): easy to flower, interesting for its medicinal properties, it spreads in the garden over the years.

    PHOTO PIERRE GINGRAS, ARCHIVES SPECIAL COLLABORATION

    Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea): easy to flower, interesting for its medicinal properties, it spreads in the garden over the years.

  • Chamomile (Matricaria recutita): beautiful dried or fresh, it also makes precious soothing infusions.

    PHOTO ARCHIVES THE PRESS

    Chamomile (Matricaria recutita): beautiful dried or fresh, it also makes precious soothing infusions.

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